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For Immediate Release                                Press Contact: Sarah Carr | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | (401) 769-9675

What: Ciné Francophone: A Rhode Island International Film Festival Event

 

When: Thursday, August 10, 7pm

 

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket

 

RIIFF 2017.jpg

 

MoWC to Screen French-Language Films for R.I. International Film Festival

 

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will host a Rhode Island International Film Festival event on Thursday, August 10, 7pm. The MoWC will screen a collection of new and dynamic films by French-language filmmakers, including:

 

  • Mutants | Directed by Alexandre Dostie | 2016
  • Emma | Directed by Martin Edralin | 2016
  • Late Night Drama | Directed by Patrice Laliberté | 2016
  • Two Dollars | Directed by Emmanuel Tenenbaum | 2016
  • Cast Off | Directed by Sandrine Brodeur-Desrosiers | 2016 (World Premiere)
  • Iris | Directed by Gabrielle Demers | 2017

 

Viewers can vote for their favorites and help decide which films advance to the next round of judging. General admission is $10, or $15 for a ticket plus a drink and popcorn. Tickets are available at ShopMoWC.com or on site before the screenings.

 

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.

 

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