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For Immediate Release             Press Contact: Sarah Carr | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | (401) 769-9675    

What: Cedric de Leon on the Origins of Right to Work [FREE EVENT]

When: Sunday, February 25, 1:30pm

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket, R.I.

 

Cedric de Leon Presents Free Talk on Right-to-Work Laws at Museum of Work & Culture

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will offer the next installment of its free Valley Talks series on Sunday, Feb. 25, at 1:30pm.

 

Writer and professor Cedric de Leon will present a talk based on his book The Origins of Right to Work: Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago, which explores the creation of right-to-work laws, tracing a line back to Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War. In doing so, de Leon connects past and present, raising critical questions that address pressing social issues.

 

Cedric de Leon is Associate Professor of Sociology at Tufts University. He has written three books, and, in a past life, was by turns an organizer and a local union president in the U.S. labor movement. He lives in Providence with his wife Emily, his son Ellis, and his poodle Atticus Finch.

 

Seating is limited to 75 and is first come, first served.

 

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Other Valley Talks will include:

 

March 11: Writer and historical reenactor Paul Bourget explores the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and what became of those who conspired in the deed.

 

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization, as well as its only Smithsonian Affiliate. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.

     

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