FREE TREES AVAILABLE TO HOMEOWNERS THIS FALL

 

Registration for popular program that helps

Rhode Islanders save energy, money opens August 21st

 

PROVIDENCE – The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) is teaming up once again with the Arbor Day Foundation, Rhode Island Tree Council, and the Rhode Island Nursery and Landscape Association to give away 1,000 trees as part of the State’s Energy-Saving Trees Program. The Program helps homeowners conserve energy and reduce utility costs while beautifying their neighborhood. 

 

"We’re excited to join with the Arbor Day Foundation and our local partners again this fall to offer free trees to Rhode Islanders,” said DEM Director Janet Coit. “This program is extremely popular and most trees are spoken for within days of registration opening - so be sure to register early! Planting a tree is a great way for homeowners to reduce their monthly expenses while promoting a healthier environment and creating a beautiful memory with their families.”   

 

Trees play an important role in cooling streets and homes, filtering air, and reducing stormwater pollution. The trees distributed under the Energy-Saving Trees Program are approximately four to six feet tall and will be distributed in three-gallon containers for easy transport.  The Rhode Island Tree Council will provide planting and care instruction to homeowners – as well as guidance on how to maximize energy-savings.  When planted properly, a single mature tree can save $30 annually in heating and cooling costs. 

 

Registration opens on August 21 and is required in order to reserve a tree. Supplies go fast, so early registration is recommended.  For more information and/or to register for the program, visit www.arborday.org/RIDEM.  Trees can be picked up during one of the following pick-up events:

 

Saturday, September 9 (9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.)  

Colt State Park, Route 114, Bristol

 

Saturday, September 16 (9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.)  

Coastal Growers Market, 2325 Boston Neck Road, Saunderstown

 

Saturday, September 23 (9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.)

Hope Street Farmers Market, 1051 Blackstone Boulevard, Providence

 

Saturday, October 7 (9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.)

RI Tree Council Headquarters, 2953 Hartford Avenue, Johnston

 

For more information on DEM's programs and divisions, visit www.dem.ri.gov or follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RhodeIslandDEM or via Twitter (@RhodeIslandDEM).

 

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