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For Immediate Release                                                          Press Contact: Sarah Carr, (401) 769-9675 x2

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What: Closing Event for Thunder & Steam: A Steampunk Fine Art Exhibit at the Museum of Work & Culture

When: Saturday, July 29, 12-4pm

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket, R.I.

 

Event Admission: Free

Museum of Work & Culture to Host Speakers for Steampunk Exhibit Finale

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will host a grand closing event on Saturday, July 29, 12-4pm, for Thunder & Steam: History Reimagined, an exhibition of Steampunk fine art.

 

The closing will include presentations by Joey Marsocci (Dr. Grymm) on his steampunk costume creatures and creations, as well as Bob Eggleton and Marianne Plumridge on techniques in fantasy and sci-fi painting.

 

Steampunk attire is welcome at the closing, but not required.

 

The exhibit, organized by Harsh Reality Ltd., includes 40 works by 14 artists, including pen & ink, illustration, oil and acrylic paintings, sculpture, and mixed media.

 

Begun as a literary genre in the 1980s, Steampunk is the melding of two worlds; the contemporary and the Victorian age. Based largely on the mythos of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, with an occasional smattering of Lovecraft, Steampunk has two distinct tracks: postapocalyptic, in which the world has been destroyed and people have resorted to the technology of the steam age to power and re-create the technology of the recent past, and altered history with ramped-up technology and science fiction in the Victorian and Early Edwardian era.

 

About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.

 

About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.

 

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